Thursday, 7 February 2013

Sepia Saturday 163







A Big Thank You To Bob

After a careful look at this week's theme image I decided to go with white whiskers of the old gent with the snow shovel.  However, Bob Scotney's John George Brown's painting eventually lead to a change of approach, if not theme.     The subject is clearly 19th. century, but the concept seems quite modern or, perhaps timeless. I was particularly taken with the painting and, therefore, decided to look him up. Whilst, he is mainly known for his paintings of street urchins, he also painted grown-up and, lo and behold, white whiskers.  I know they're not Sepia nor Photos, so I've included some white whiskers of the family.

 Great Great Granddad - William - Blacksmith
 Great Granddad - Robert - Blacksmith
 Granddad - William - Blacksmith
Himself  -  Blogger

Below appear the white whiskers of the brush of John George Brown;
Happy Cobbler 
 Lecher Leers?
 Grandpa Bores Grandson
 At Rest
 Carpenter Nearly Done
Wistful Workman
 Old Gent 
Three Old Gents.

And, to show balance
 White Haired Old Woman






36 comments:

  1. What a fantastic take on the theme. Great paintings! I especially like the Happy Cobbler.

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  2. What an interesting focus for this week's prompt. Real people and those imagined are equally fine representations.

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  3. Mmmhh ... the Dundreary whiskers seem to run in the family. Have you always had them?

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    1. I wasn't born with them. Back in the 60's and 70's I had a long beard (sometimes half way down my chest) and long (very long) hair. Since then I've been moustached (Jimmy Edwards type) clean shaven, Sideburned (teddy boy to muttonchops) to what you see now. The face without whiskers doesn't seem complete.
      I would have included my oldest son, but unfortunately he's a carrot and that didn't fit the white image.

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    2. Being bearded myself, and having been asked the same question countless times, that's exactly the answer I was after ;-) I haven't been clean shaven - apart from the odd day or two - for well over three decades.

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    3. I've just had a good look at your little picture, is that you? How did you create the CdV image. It looks quite genuine.

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    4. Hi Mike :) yes that's me. My daughter, who's much more of a whiz at Photoshop that I am, created it for me a couple of years ago.

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  4. Ahh : I had a Great Grandfather John (Burnett) who was a blacksmith and another Great Grandfather (A Beanland, this one) who was a whitesmith. I wonder whether that makes me a greysmith!

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    1. Both Williams' had a brother John who happened to be Blacksmiths. The older in Barugh, and the younger (he feature a few weeks ago on the beach) in Coxwold. Also on my Father's maternal Grandfather is listed, variously, has tinker, tinsmith or whitesmith.

      Are we actually different people?

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  5. Whiskers! You saw a detail that many of us would not usually notice. Fantastic! I love the paintings. Just my kind of subject, the background, the aura.

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  6. You're a lateral thinker! Fantastic pictures.

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  7. Never saw a greater set of whiskers than the one here. Come to think of it, it's a pity Elvis Presley died before his whiskers could turn white.

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  8. It's quite remarkable how my photo resulted in you giving us a fine whiskers show. I must say that the Burnetts would make a magnificent set of models for John George Brown. Definitely not a lot of cobblers!

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  9. All those mustaches in the ones of your family ... and then the beautiful paintings. Thank you for using your imagination!

    Kathy M.

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    1. I have a hairy son, but at his tender age he is still carrot

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  10. The whiskers are splendid. They're so, well... masculine. And they add an air of gravitas and quirkiness to the wearer, a hard combination to achieve in any other way. I always wondered how many generations of whiskered blacksmiths it takes to create one whiskered blogger? Now I (one of three drunken maidens) have the answer.

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  11. I like the way you threw in himself.

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  12. Oh, I love your whiskers. You fit right in with your ancestors and the paintings.
    Nancy

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    1. Thank you but do you think they make my chin look fat?

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  13. What a fine family with mustaches. I think it is true what Confucius said, "A man without a moustache is a man without a soul." My husband is also a mustache man :)

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  14. & very Practical in this Cold Weather! Sort of like a portable loft-insulation ? I'm surprised the government hasnt thought of taxing facial hair!

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  15. I loved this hairy gallery and the best picture was of the blogger himself. I do hope the white haired old lady didn't have a whiskery chin!

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    1. That's very nice of you. I'm the only one still living, I suppose that helps. When I was a kid in the late 40's/early 50's I seem to recall that there were always one or two old ladies that fell into the granny Grow Beard category - not sure if our one does.

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  16. I have come to the conclusion that there is a different beard/mustache for every man, they all look so different on each man.....

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  17. Wonderful take off on the theme, and love all the pictures...my husband had a mustache for many years, and I imagine ifhe ever gets to retire, will go back!

    Jan @ Jans Place

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  18. How simpley delightful this was- I knew someone had to expand on that long white beard- I mean really the man was directly looking at us! You did too- great titles with each one too!

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  19. Heya, Mike, the eyes never change -- nice eyes of man and boy -- and the whiskers are good too.

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  20. Why thank you Joan, it is sweet of you to say so.

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  21. A handsome set of hirsute gents! My family now has three generations of whiskers between my father, my son, and myself, but without uniformity and in three separate styles.

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  22. Are whiskers a pre-requisite for being a blacksmith? Not for blogging, that much I know... [hastily looking in a mirror].

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  23. Sheila, you're far to young and cute to be a Granny-Grow-Beard that much I see Inner Eye.

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  24. Well, you've certainly turned a hairy situation into a fun post.
    And perpetuated the whiskers tradition!!
    :)~
    HUGZ

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